drainage

The Livingston Parish Council took the first step Jan. 17 toward a plan that could reduce the risk of severe flooding, something which has been become a heightened concern since the August 2016 disaster.   

The proposed ordinance would eliminate waivers on studies and expand impact studies and drainage design requirements on watershed maps and hydrologic design.

The plans also would require impact studies based on 25- and 100-year rain events, up from 10- and 50-year studies.

The changes would fall into line with requirements in place in Ascension, East Baton Rouge and Tangipahoa parishes.

The proposal comes to the council as the development of residential subdivisions continues, just over three years after the area’s worst flood in modern history.

The move may draw some pushback from developers, who will have to bear the brunt of additional costs for studies before they pass muster with the Parish Council.

The move, however, is long overdue. The proposal would bring consistency to flood management throughout the parish and hold every developer to the same standard.

It’s a departure from a system in which developers could broker deals to take short cuts and save money, at the expense of potentially faulty drainage.

It’s only the first step for the Parish Council, which eventually wants to bring forth changes to the codes for multifamily and commercial developments.

Livingston Parish ranks only behind Ascension Parish as the most rapidly growing parish in the state. It’s beyond time for the parish to upgrade the standard that comes with progress.

When in doubt on that notion, remember August 2016.

The Livingston Parish Council took the first step Jan. 17 toward a plan that could reduce the risk of severe flooding, something which has been become a heightened concern since the August 2016 disaster.

The proposed ordinance would eliminate waivers on studies and expand impact studies and drainage design requirements on watershed maps and hydrologic design.

The plans also would require impact studies based on 25- and 100-year rain events, up from 10- and 50-year studies.

The changes would fall into line with requirements in place in Ascension, East Baton Rouge and Tangipahoa parishes.

The proposal comes to the council as the development of residential subdivisions continues in Livingston Parish, just over three years after the area’s worst flood in modern history.

The move may draw some pushback from developers, who will have to bear the brunt of additional costs for studies before they pass muster with the Parish Council.

The move, however, is long overdue. The proposal would bring consistency to flood management throughout the parish and hold every developer to the same standard.

It’s a departure from a system in which developers could broker deals to take short cuts and save money, at the expense of potentially faulty drainage.

It’s only the first step for the Parish Council, which eventually wants to bring forth changes to the codes for multifamily and commercial developments.

Livingston Parish ranks only behind Ascension Parish as the most rapidly growing parish in the state. It’s beyond time for the parish to upgrade the standard that comes with progress.

When in doubt on that notion, remember August 2016.

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(1) comment

BigBob

About time! Now, get moving on multi-family and commercial. The Western side of the parish is in dire need of appropriate ZONING! Just DO IT!

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